There’s a Wait? Um … No Thank You.

Waiting without frustration takes … patience. Such a wonderful and dreadful virtue. Dinner is warm and ready on the table and you’re waiting for your spouse to get home. Ugh, it’s going to get cold. The car is running and ready to go and you’re waiting for the other passenger to get in. Ugh, you’re going to be late. You’re ready to eat but the food still has twenty minutes to cook. You’re ready to watch that video but it still has to buffer. You’re ready to to buy a product but the cashier has to change from the pink striped receipt paper to a new role. You’re ready to drive the speed limit (or more like five over—just five though, they don’t pull you over for just five) but the car in front of you doesn’t. Ugh, feel the frustration?

Patience is wonderful when you’re the spouse or passenger running late, the cashier, or the car that is just gets going. On the other hand, patience is dreadful when you have to wait on someone or something else.

Do you struggle with patience regarding Jesus’ return?
Unfortunately for many Christians, this would be a step in the right direction. Why? Because we often don’t even think about Jesus’ return. It just doesn’t play much of a role in our everyday life. I didn’t wake up this morning with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t send my kids off to school with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t check Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and email with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t go to work with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t do research, read articles, run machines, fix problems, and crunch numbers with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t tidy up the house with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t meet someone for lunch with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t take up my hobby with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t come home to my family after work with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t watch a little tv, do a bit of light reading, and play with my kids with the expectation of Jesus’ return. I didn’t do a crossword or sudoku with the expectation of Jesus’ return. What is wrong with me?!

I want to struggle with being frustrated that Jesus hasn’t returned yet. I want to repent of that sin, rather than my sin of indifference. I shouldn’t sin at all, but at least if I were frustrated and impatient then it would indicate that I cared somewhat about it. My indifference shows me how little I really love the Savior of my soul. I say with Paul, “Wretched man that I am!” (Romans 7:24). Such rotten indifference surely places me in the category of chief sinner, along with Paul (1 Timothy 1:15).
You might be thinking, does Paul have anything nice to say? Not really, at least not about me and my pitiful show of love to my gracious Rescuer.

Paul does give me help in reversing my indifference: “Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ.” (Philippians 3:8)

I should wake up, go about my day, and end it as I go to bed seeking to gain Christ. Wanting Jesus will inevitably lead to my wanting his return. Maybe then I would struggle being patient with his delay.